The Value of Summer Breezes for Life/Work Balance

After we in higher education engage in one, or numerous Commencement ceremonies, and feel a sense of satisfaction that we continue to guide the development of our nation’s intellectual capital, many of our thoughts drift to a summer season of different projects and/or vacations.

As many others in the workforce have experienced, I would surmise, some of the most peaceful and restorative memories of the summer include strolling on the beach enjoying ocean breezes blowing through your hair, being soothed by the relaxing sound of the waves hitting the shore on a beautiful, blue sky day, and/or enjoying the natural beauty of wooded areas—without cellular connections.  After about a week or so of listening to the waves, enjoying the peace of morning kayaking, or moving about without meetings and schedules, if we are lucky, a sense of renewed vitality and creativity emanates throughout our bodies.

Yet, for some reason, many Americans find reasons not to take their vacation days.  Possibly, these workers feel that staying on the job and forgoing vacation days will keep them from falling behind, or possibly that staying physically at the job is a demonstration of loyalty, and therefore, a more direct line to success.  Thus, it does not surprise me that several sources report that Americans take fewer vacation days than Europeans—leaving paid remuneration on the table or lost altogether.  It is hard to imagine that with the increasingly persistent emails, text messages, conference calls, webinars, and videoconferencing (not to mention social media), that the need to disconnect from the work world has not become acknowledged as critical.  Work worlds, moreover, are microcosms that are intricately linked to family worlds, political contexts, stock market performances, and global communities.

So, what is so special about going on vacation?  Well for one thing, some of my psychologists colleagues have convinced me that the 24/7 work worlds that many of us live in produce negative effects on our bodies on both psychological and chemical levels. We need to periodically decompress and allow ourselves to experience some measure of peace without feeling guilty for using vacation days that are usually portrayed as benefits.  It does not take an astute observer to note that there is life beyond work, and that a healthy life/work balance is essential to a productive workforce.

Conversations with colleagues over the years, and observations of colleagues, suggest that there is more than a modicum of chronic stress in our work lives that, if gone unchecked, will take unpleasant tolls on the body’s ability to resist infection, to maintain high energy levels, and to remain healthy enough to perform work at levels that contribute to productivity, innovation, and a desirable work environment.

There have been too many conversations with work colleagues about elevated blood pressure, acid reflux, inability to sleep through the night, memory issues, and a plethora of prescription medications needed to continue to work.  Possibly, middle-aged employees experience these symptoms more than Millennial workers, but it is probably just a matter of matter of time—unless  the work environment changes to encompass a more holistic view of the lives and needs of its human intellectual capital.  Possibly, Millennials can help furnish some leadership in developing a work environment that is both supportive, challenging, and productive.

Until then, we might want to reconsider the value of vacation days!

Susan Krauss Whitbourne, Ph.D. (2010), The Importance of Vacations to our Physical and Mental Health, Psychology Today,  (retrieved May 21, 2017).

Natalie Burg (2014), Forbes, Do The Europeans Have it Right?  Do we Need More Time Off to be On at Work? (retrieved May 21, 2017).

The College Core: Essential for Augmenting Life’s Potential

The College Core: Essential for Augmenting Life’s Potential

Recently, with some colleagues, I have been thinking, and engaging in dialogue, about the outcomes of a general education curriculum, or Core, at our university and similar institutions. Similar to parents around the nation, we know it is essential to identify, and measure,  the learning outcomes of the college Core and competencies gained from the  overall college experience.   However, it seems fair to acknowledge that it is possible to attain similar learning outcomes from experiential learning outside of a college Core curriculum, but it might take longer, and be less efficient.

Regardless of how the Core is described to prospective students and parents, most Global_Scholarship-03colleges and universities state, in carefully crafted language, that the Core promotes foundational and broad knowledge to prepare graduates to demonstrate a high level of proficiency in communications, critical thinking, analytical adeptness, and global awareness. This knowledge and skills, it is often argued, form the basis for developing important intellectual and emotional readiness for a life of continuous learning through advanced higher education, quickly changing professional jobs, and civic engagement.

One college stated that the three overarching goals of the Core are helping students know the world, engage the world, and understand the world. Another university termed their Core Curriculum — Making Connections. That university states that it “strives to cultivate the range of skills, knowledge, values, and habits that will allow graduates to lead personally enriching and socially responsible lives as effective citizens of rapidly changing, richly diverse, and increasingly interconnected local, national, and worldwide communities.” *

Most of the learning outcomes of a college Core are also aligned with knowledge and skills that many employers also expect from their employees. These include communication skills (listening, speaking and writing), analytical and problem-solving skills, computer and technical adeptness, teamwork, and lifelong learning skills. Not surprisingly, employers, also, want employees to demonstrate a good work ethic.

Beyond the aforementioned, college/university Cores can also help a student gain confidence because he/she is able to understand better personal growth and emotional maturity, to understand others in local and extended communities, and to engage thoughtfully in contributing to our democracy on local, state, and national levels. When you think about the learning outcomes of a college Core, in reference to lifelong learning, career readiness, and engaged citizenry, its lifelong significance extends—like ripples in a pond. Many students transition from the Core more confident in their abilities to think critically—potentially a survival skill for future generations.

*The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, retrieved online from catalog.unc.edu on April 9, 2017.

Establishing Intentional and Guided Career Pathways for Students and for Regional Economic Development

As we approach the new academic year in higher education, many of us are keenly aware of the seemingly intractable challenges facing our nation. Some of these are eroding our collective sense of well-being and our confidence in our abilities to achieve a range of goals for students. Thus, it seems more urgent than ever before to undergird the hopes of incoming and continuing students with curricular and co-curricular learning opportunities that will lead to better opportunities for themselves, their families, and their expanded communities.

FMU guidance2Even though I have welcomed new and returning students to institutions of higher education for decades, this year, I especially look forward to constructing guided career pathways through faculty leadership at Florida Memorial University (FMU). Located in the extremely diverse South Florida, FMU, like many liberal arts universities, produces responsible and contributing citizens who will hopefully continue to strive throughout their lifetimes, while illustrating character, leadership, and commitment to lifelong learning.

What is particularly refreshing and transformational about this year is that there is an energized faculty movement to create guided career pathways through curriculum innovation, co-curricular activities (such as early internships and capstone experiences), and collaborations with business leaders to insure that the holistic collegiate experience of FMU’s students fulfills their academic interests and personal upward mobility needs. In order to design guided and intentional career pathways, faculty and institutional researchers are employing regional and national data to identify majors, minors, certifications, and graduate programs that are most likely to lead to gainful, professional employment––and then filling in the gaps.

Like most other institutions of higher education, FMU has its share of student success stories, like the student who, by the time of this posting, will probably have completed her doctorate in radiochemistry. There are also significant numbers of students pursuing graduate study at prestigious graduate schools or beginning their professional careers. However, the faculty-led guided career pathways movement seeks to expose students to more choices for emerging career areas, and expand options in existing areas, as supported by data. These careers are, and will be, important to the economy–careers such as digital communications, cybersecurity, forensics, construction management, and data analytics.

So, as students commence another academic year, it is difficult to not be stimulated intellectually and inspired by this faculty-led movement that is supported by the UNCF and funded by the Lily Endowment. The development of career pathways will also help faculty review and identify specific intellectual competencies and skills that they can measure and certify, as students transition to varied positions and a lifetime of learning to further refine their post baccalaureate competencies and assure their continued professional growth.

Alas, it is time to end this blog and resume preparations for a coming faculty/business leaders forum that will focus on competencies needed by various industries to both guide our renewal as an institution of higher education, and furnish the intellectual capital needed for regional economic development. By this continuous renewal and assessment, we assure our students that they will be ready for the future!

How Can We Leverage the Creativity in the Workforce for a Better Future?

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source: http://evolllution.com/opinions/serving-the-next-generation-workforce/

I have been thinking lately a lot about work. What function does or should work have in establishing well-being in our society? Beyond earning salaries or wages, why should we work? Are there benefits in work beyond the satisfaction of performing your craft well? What role does work have in sustaining families and communities beyond paying household bills? Is there something ethereal in men/women that work touches, enhances or creates?  Can work lead to self-actualization–the merging of creativity with craft that lifts the individual, the organization, and the interrelated work families?

Probably as long as women/men have existed, there has been some version of work. It is reasonable to imagine that work for prehistoric humans related to tasks that increased survival–food, shelter, and probably other tasks related to Maslow’s hierarchy-physiological and safety needs. However, as many of us rush back and forth to work daily, we probably also realize that we share our lives with others in work worlds. These work worlds can furnish opportunities for us to collaborate and learn from colleagues while obtaining gratification and inspiration from attaining personal and professional goals. And, to attract new talents, some employers are realizing that work worlds need to evolve to fit the needs and expectations of several generations in the workplace.

From some Millennials, we are learning that work worlds that are more satisfying and supportive of a holistic and balanced lifestyle hold a competitive edge in recruiting new talent. Companies like Google attract Millennials with free food, dry cleaning, on-site fitness facilities, and flexible work schedules– attempting to respond to the values of this generation. Other employers report that Millennials work better in teams, when appreciation is shown, and when global opportunities are involved.

According to a 2014 article in Harvard Business Review, managers in the current and future workforce, are, and can be for some time, managing several generations of workers–the first time this situation has existed in history. Experts offer that managers should encourage collaboration, up and down mentoring, and above all, leverage the expertise of all individuals for a more creative and productive workforce.

As we redefine higher education and create technologically enhanced learning environments, leveraging expertise and promoting individual creativity will make all the difference in realizing the potential of higher education for a better future.

GENERATIONAL ISSUES
Managing People from 5 Generations
Rebecca Knight, Harvard Business Review,
SEPTEMBER 25, 2014

How Do We Help The Millennial Generation Develop a Sense of Purpose?

Refined from August 6, 2009, President’s Blog

Every year this time, faculty and staff at colleges and universities around the nation are greeting new and returning students for the academic year. For many of us in academia, there is anticipation and a personal sense of renewal with each new class of students.

During the summer months, faculty refresh courses materials, construct course packs, and design their instruction and assessment to respond to the intellectual and emotional needs of this new cohort of students.  Also, during the summer, the admissions and financial aid professionals have been busy answering telephones to help families manage transitions into the higher learning communities of colleges and universities. Other middle and senior managers also have been busy refining policies and procedures that will guide the campus community through the upcoming academic year.

As I participated in, and observed, these various preparation activities, I realized that one of our challenges is to determine how we can contribute to the development of a sense of purpose in our new and returning students. This sense of purpose will, hopefully, be ignited by the general education curriculum and, appropriately, expanded and enhanced by an academic major and interactions with faculty and mentors.

On the surface, many students will attest that they come to college to pursue specific careers, or to increase their earning potential over their lifetimes. However, if we delve beyond their veneers, we discover that many students come to college searching for a future, searching for their passions, and searching for something that is bigger … something that they can commit their talents and affinities to – a sense of purpose. English novelist Mary Wollstonecraft Shelly (1797-1851), the author of the famous Gothic novel, Frankenstein, is quoted as stating, “Nothing contributes so much to tranquilizing the mind, as a steady purpose – a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye.”

As I reflect, it seems that it is the intellectual and spiritual realization of a compelling sense of purpose that is the ultimate goal of higher education—possibly it is the ultimate goal of the human existence. If we succeed in our colleges and universities, our students will leave with a vision and sense of purpose that is bigger than the acquisition of material possessions or gaining a high-paying first job. Possibly, the sense of purpose they gain at our educational institutions will result in their being a better neighbor, in developing a more enlightened view of the interconnectedness of all humans, and in participating more aggressively in sustaining the environment for future generations.

For those who want to measure the value of colleges and universities, how to you measure this outcome, “a point on which the soul may fix its intellectual eye”?

Maybe this emotional, intellectual, and spiritual transformation of members of our society is really the quintessential purpose of college–of quality education.

I hope that all of us, who guide the education of college students will also move forth with a steady sense of purpose.