Guiding Students to Find/Define Their Own Uniqueness and Beauty

In Fall orientation in many colleges and universities, freshman students will be introduced to an array of faculty and staff, academic disciplines, reading lists, co-FMU-Studentscurricular activities, clubs and fraternities, university resources, and the beginning of new adventures in self-discovery encompassing exposure to different perspectives and development of academic and emotional intelligence.

Over the years, I have had the pleasure of observing many students enter as eager, and somewhat uncertain, freshmen and develop into more confident individuals ready to find their purposes and places in an evolving world.

However, while watching students move onto campus, I have noticed a trend that is somewhat disturbing. It appears that more college freshmen are arriving on college campuses with an unbelievable amount of material possessions and personal “looks” that are more appropriate for the entertainment industry than for a higher education learning community. Moreover, when it is time to buy books or pay fees, some of these same students make decisions to continue to buy more material possessions, fashions, and personal amenities rather than invest in resources to further their education.

This year, as we focus on students and introduce them to college life, we will also attempt to engage students in small group conversations about contemplating the reflections they see in the mirror, gaining an understanding of their own special uniqueness, beauty, and developing a personal brand that exceeds Hollywood, celebrities, one-dimensional personas, and commercialized versions of how lives are supposed to be lived.

Maybe, in addition to gaining knowledge, students will graduate with positive self-confidence, a sense of purpose, a moral compass, and an appreciation of their own uniqueness and beauty.

 

The Heart of any Company is its Employees

Recently at a meeting with colleagues at the American Council on Education, we discussed the College presidency, the average age of college presidents, and how to engage in both succession planning and preparation of a qualified cadre of candidates for future college presidents, or those at least willing to consider the opportunities and challenges of leading an institution of higher education.

working_together_teamwork_jigsaw_puzzleEven though higher education is witnessing a transitional in leadership and re-envisioning its responsiveness to societal needs, as a sector, it is probably not alone. Many industries are undergoing similar transformations, as they experience rapid technological changes, the surge of online transactions, new generations of workers, and global competitors.  One of the obvious questions in the workforce is how do we prepare leaders who will lead multi-generational and diverse workforces in a very digital age, in a range of industries, to meet current and future consumer and societal needs? Without a doubt, there are numerous leadership gurus and perspectives, programs, and adages.

Yet, the core of it is that the heart of any company is its employees. Regardless of rank, education, or generation, employees, for the most part, are the key to innovation, productivity, and perceived value of the company. Employees, for their part, want to be recognized, respected, valued, and informed how their daily activities somehow benefit the well-being of society. Because employees change jobs six or more times in their careers, it is also important for employers to furnish incentives, design collaborative teams, and offer acknowledgements to keep talented employees and to maintain a positive working environment.

Given our current national political divides, creating a cohesive workforce based on shared values could be at least one way to bridge some of our differences and build a more perfect union.

The College Core: Essential for Augmenting Life’s Potential

The College Core: Essential for Augmenting Life’s Potential

Recently, with some colleagues, I have been thinking, and engaging in dialogue, about the outcomes of a general education curriculum, or Core, at our university and similar institutions. Similar to parents around the nation, we know it is essential to identify, and measure,  the learning outcomes of the college Core and competencies gained from the  overall college experience.   However, it seems fair to acknowledge that it is possible to attain similar learning outcomes from experiential learning outside of a college Core curriculum, but it might take longer, and be less efficient.

Regardless of how the Core is described to prospective students and parents, most Global_Scholarship-03colleges and universities state, in carefully crafted language, that the Core promotes foundational and broad knowledge to prepare graduates to demonstrate a high level of proficiency in communications, critical thinking, analytical adeptness, and global awareness. This knowledge and skills, it is often argued, form the basis for developing important intellectual and emotional readiness for a life of continuous learning through advanced higher education, quickly changing professional jobs, and civic engagement.

One college stated that the three overarching goals of the Core are helping students know the world, engage the world, and understand the world. Another university termed their Core Curriculum — Making Connections. That university states that it “strives to cultivate the range of skills, knowledge, values, and habits that will allow graduates to lead personally enriching and socially responsible lives as effective citizens of rapidly changing, richly diverse, and increasingly interconnected local, national, and worldwide communities.” *

Most of the learning outcomes of a college Core are also aligned with knowledge and skills that many employers also expect from their employees. These include communication skills (listening, speaking and writing), analytical and problem-solving skills, computer and technical adeptness, teamwork, and lifelong learning skills. Not surprisingly, employers, also, want employees to demonstrate a good work ethic.

Beyond the aforementioned, college/university Cores can also help a student gain confidence because he/she is able to understand better personal growth and emotional maturity, to understand others in local and extended communities, and to engage thoughtfully in contributing to our democracy on local, state, and national levels. When you think about the learning outcomes of a college Core, in reference to lifelong learning, career readiness, and engaged citizenry, its lifelong significance extends—like ripples in a pond. Many students transition from the Core more confident in their abilities to think critically—potentially a survival skill for future generations.

*The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, retrieved online from catalog.unc.edu on April 9, 2017.

Workforce Teams: Coaching to Enhance Team Effectiveness

Working_Together_Teamwork_Jigsaw_Puzzle.jpgGood winning teams have good coaches. Even though coaches are more commonly associated with athletic teams, as we continue to work in teams in the evolving workplace, good coaches are becoming more critical to the success of many organizations. Some organizations’ leaders prefer teams because an appropriately balanced team can bring with it diverse viewpoints to find solutions and identify opportunities. Further, the team, as a whole, can marshal enormous intellectual capital and innovation in a less hierarchical work environment. With clear direction, most teams can accomplish projects more quickly than individuals working alone.

It is not surprising that most organizations tend to equate success with accomplishing strategic goals in very competitive environments. Moreover, it is becoming more and more obvious that success depends not only on institutional leaders, but it also depends on the daily professional practices of individuals in the organization. Oftentimes, it is winning teams that propel an organization into innovative and profitable futures.

Some organizational analysts believe that, in addition to a team’s effectiveness, working in teams improves overall individual effectiveness and satisfaction. Yet working in teams presents challenges in how to appraise and motivate the performance of teams and individual members.  Similar to athletic teams, a winning team might have a range of stars and members who assist—all needed to win. Moreover, with our expanded capacities for connectivity and extending collaborations in global teams and virtual workplaces, the complexities of appraising or coaching teams magnify. So, just how does the team leader or coach do that?

Well, coaching now seems to be a burgeoning profession, complete with psychological and organizational underpinnings. There are certified coaching programs that seek to produce leadership coaches, life coaches, health coaches, and insightful coaches who can employ motivational tools, strategies, interpersonal skills, and maybe a little personal magic, to help individuals push through barriers and achieve desired breakthroughs.

A colleague of mine just informed me that a successful CEO employed a coach for twenty-five years—makes me wonder what I have missed!

From even a brief review of coaching, it becomes clear that a good workplace team coach shares attributes similar to those of an athletic coach developing a winning team. These coaches 1) make sure everyone understands the team strategies and rules, 2) learn the strengths and talents of each team member to determine who should do what, 3) assess the team’s effectiveness, 4) observe the relationships between behaviors of individual team members and the team’s results, 5) furnish specific feedback about performance in a respectful and supportive manner, and 6) offer specific solutions to maximize the effectiveness of each individual team member—with solutions that can be as diverse as the team members.

From coaching vignettes I have read, good coaching seems to combine exceptional interpersonal skills, the ability to establish rapport and trust, and some knowledge of human psychology. For one thing, it is hard to find a description of coaching that does not describe a good coach as someone who listens well, seeks to understand the individual, and offers the support, assistance, and advice needed to succeed. Moreover, the discussion of workplace performance with coaches is portrayed as more mutually respectful, beneficial, and empowering to the individual than are supervisor and subordinate performance appraisal interactions.

Alas, there do not seem to be one-size-fits-all rules for coaching team members because they are individuals, and there are so many nuances in the workplace across regions, generations, and institutional cultures. Moreover, there are ranges of characteristics and work environments in which teams operate.

However, from my readings and feedback from those who have been coached, the coaching profession is just getting started!

Establishing Intentional and Guided Career Pathways for Students and for Regional Economic Development

As we approach the new academic year in higher education, many of us are keenly aware of the seemingly intractable challenges facing our nation. Some of these are eroding our collective sense of well-being and our confidence in our abilities to achieve a range of goals for students. Thus, it seems more urgent than ever before to undergird the hopes of incoming and continuing students with curricular and co-curricular learning opportunities that will lead to better opportunities for themselves, their families, and their expanded communities.

FMU guidance2Even though I have welcomed new and returning students to institutions of higher education for decades, this year, I especially look forward to constructing guided career pathways through faculty leadership at Florida Memorial University (FMU). Located in the extremely diverse South Florida, FMU, like many liberal arts universities, produces responsible and contributing citizens who will hopefully continue to strive throughout their lifetimes, while illustrating character, leadership, and commitment to lifelong learning.

What is particularly refreshing and transformational about this year is that there is an energized faculty movement to create guided career pathways through curriculum innovation, co-curricular activities (such as early internships and capstone experiences), and collaborations with business leaders to insure that the holistic collegiate experience of FMU’s students fulfills their academic interests and personal upward mobility needs. In order to design guided and intentional career pathways, faculty and institutional researchers are employing regional and national data to identify majors, minors, certifications, and graduate programs that are most likely to lead to gainful, professional employment––and then filling in the gaps.

Like most other institutions of higher education, FMU has its share of student success stories, like the student who, by the time of this posting, will probably have completed her doctorate in radiochemistry. There are also significant numbers of students pursuing graduate study at prestigious graduate schools or beginning their professional careers. However, the faculty-led guided career pathways movement seeks to expose students to more choices for emerging career areas, and expand options in existing areas, as supported by data. These careers are, and will be, important to the economy–careers such as digital communications, cybersecurity, forensics, construction management, and data analytics.

So, as students commence another academic year, it is difficult to not be stimulated intellectually and inspired by this faculty-led movement that is supported by the UNCF and funded by the Lily Endowment. The development of career pathways will also help faculty review and identify specific intellectual competencies and skills that they can measure and certify, as students transition to varied positions and a lifetime of learning to further refine their post baccalaureate competencies and assure their continued professional growth.

Alas, it is time to end this blog and resume preparations for a coming faculty/business leaders forum that will focus on competencies needed by various industries to both guide our renewal as an institution of higher education, and furnish the intellectual capital needed for regional economic development. By this continuous renewal and assessment, we assure our students that they will be ready for the future!

How Can We Leverage the Creativity in the Workforce for a Better Future?

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source: http://evolllution.com/opinions/serving-the-next-generation-workforce/

I have been thinking lately a lot about work. What function does or should work have in establishing well-being in our society? Beyond earning salaries or wages, why should we work? Are there benefits in work beyond the satisfaction of performing your craft well? What role does work have in sustaining families and communities beyond paying household bills? Is there something ethereal in men/women that work touches, enhances or creates?  Can work lead to self-actualization–the merging of creativity with craft that lifts the individual, the organization, and the interrelated work families?

Probably as long as women/men have existed, there has been some version of work. It is reasonable to imagine that work for prehistoric humans related to tasks that increased survival–food, shelter, and probably other tasks related to Maslow’s hierarchy-physiological and safety needs. However, as many of us rush back and forth to work daily, we probably also realize that we share our lives with others in work worlds. These work worlds can furnish opportunities for us to collaborate and learn from colleagues while obtaining gratification and inspiration from attaining personal and professional goals. And, to attract new talents, some employers are realizing that work worlds need to evolve to fit the needs and expectations of several generations in the workplace.

From some Millennials, we are learning that work worlds that are more satisfying and supportive of a holistic and balanced lifestyle hold a competitive edge in recruiting new talent. Companies like Google attract Millennials with free food, dry cleaning, on-site fitness facilities, and flexible work schedules– attempting to respond to the values of this generation. Other employers report that Millennials work better in teams, when appreciation is shown, and when global opportunities are involved.

According to a 2014 article in Harvard Business Review, managers in the current and future workforce, are, and can be for some time, managing several generations of workers–the first time this situation has existed in history. Experts offer that managers should encourage collaboration, up and down mentoring, and above all, leverage the expertise of all individuals for a more creative and productive workforce.

As we redefine higher education and create technologically enhanced learning environments, leveraging expertise and promoting individual creativity will make all the difference in realizing the potential of higher education for a better future.

GENERATIONAL ISSUES
Managing People from 5 Generations
Rebecca Knight, Harvard Business Review,
SEPTEMBER 25, 2014

From Specific Competencies to Career Pathways

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Recently, some faculty and staff colleagues at Florida Memorial University submitted a proposal to compete for a Career Pathways grant. The purpose of this national competition was to encourage institutions to partner with business and industry leaders to refine academic programs, curricular, and co-curricular experiences to assure that students leave with competencies needed in specific workforces and careers. The grant’s overarching assumption is that more collaboration between industry leaders and faculty would lead to clearer career pathways for students from academic programs to current and emerging disciplines/workforce needs.

While this, in itself, is not a new idea, the grantors appear to be echoing the sentiments of many students, parents, employers, and taxpayers regarding the thorny transitions from academic degree programs to desired employment.

Ironically, nearly a thousand years ago or so, it was common for younger persons seeking to acquire specific competencies to work alongside skilled craftsmen until they could demonstrate mastery. Thus, there was a closer and more discernible link between specialized knowledge, experiential learning, and competencies related to entrance into specific professions and trades.

Nearly a millennium later,  after the multiplication of universities, degree programs, certifications, accreditation organizations, unions, and more formalized apprenticeship and internship programs, the link between learner and mastery of specific competencies seems to have eroded. Educators and policy analysts regularly point out varying disconnects between the learning outcomes of high school and the admissions requirements for college. Others note similar disconnects between college degree outcomes and competencies needed for admission into well-paying jobs.

Probably because of the costs involved for individuals and families in pursuing a college education, the expectation is that the investment will guarantee the acquisition of specific competencies that in turn will lead to well-paying careers and middle-class lifestyles.

According to some,  “credentialing” has gone amok in the 21st century. Instead of facilitating a clear pathway from higher education to a career, some colleges and universities have been viewed as generating a proliferation of degrees that load students with irrelevant courses, leaving them with burgeoning debt, and not closer to well-paying careers. Further, families have observed that students seeking entrance into specific careers and the job market, in general, find themselves confused and facing what many view as a fragmented array of educational options and undefined competencies from secondary school through advanced education.

Education stakeholders such as the Lumina Foundation, America Council on Education, and the Lilly Foundation, to name a few, have sought to increase transparency and clarity in credentialing in higher education by engaging in a national dialogue about the need for clearer paths from secondary schools to specific careers.

Thus, the work by faculty and staff at Florida Memorial University to clearly describe degree competencies and engage in dialogues with industry representatives is a strong step in the right direction.